Learn About Layers of a Roof

The 7 Different Layers of Your Roof

Understanding The Different Layers of a Roof
Knowing your roof system is essential for a successful project and a positive experience when hiring a roofing company. Roof systems are incredibly complex. Every part of the system helps to protect your home from severe weather.

On the surface, a roof may look like a simple layer of tiles, shingles, and slate. In fact, it is a complex system consisting of several layers of different materials that resist the forces of nature and help you control humidity and temperature levels. Each roof layer has a specific purpose, and they work together to protect your home and increase living comfort under the roof. Let us look at the layers that penetrate a roof and their purpose.

Layer 1: Attic Insulation
Your attic is part of your entire roof system. Insulating your roof and attic can help keep energy in your home, reduce the heating and cooling load of your HVAC, improve your home’s energy efficiency, and reduce overall utility costs. One element of a roof system is the roof insulation, a blocking material that is laid between the rafters and beams supporting the roof beams and beams and the attic. Proper insulation slows the heat transfer from the outside world to the living space, creating a cooler home in summer and a warmer home in winter. The roof insulation also prevents damage caused by ice accumulation, which occurs when warm air escapes from the roof and heats up the snow.

To protect your roof as much as possible, you should ensure that your attic is well ventilated. The general roof ventilation promotes the natural air flow through the attic and keeps it at an even temperature and humidity level.

Layer 2: Roof Ventilation
A roof ventilation system reduces the likelihood of ice dams, provides more comfortable living conditions, drier insulation, lower energy costs and extends the life of roofs. A ventilation system consists of inlet and outlet openings that are installed at strategic intervals on the roof and in the attic. Common types of vent openings are ridge openings, gable openings and static vent openings.
Layer 3: Roof Decking or Roof Sheathing
After framing, the plywood roof layer is installed in a typical roof installation. The roof layer forms the structure that connects the trusses and beams. Horizontal wood and metal rest on the tops of the roof. The rafters and truss are connected by ridges and planks to form a continuous scaffolding.
Layer 4: Roof Flashing
The flashing light usually consists of a metal such as galvanized steel, aluminum, or copper. Self-adhesive, waterproof, self-sealing membranes are applied to the roof deck. These membranes are designed to protect against water ingress, ice formation and wind-driven rain. They are used to drain water from chimneys and side panels where the roof elements overlap.

Roof flashing is the metal underneath the shingles at the line the edge of your roof. Its purpose is to seal the edges of the roof to increase its resistance to wind and rain. It tends to fail on heavy winds, so shingles should be checked regularly to make sure your home is waterproof and sealed.

Layer 5: Roof Underlayment
Roof underlayment is the material that is between layer 3 and layer 6. It is the protective layer between the roof sheathing and shingles. Many homes use 30-pound rubberized asphalt film made of felt, which provides an additional protective layer between shingles and the roof terrace, and it prevents wind-driven rain from penetrating the shingle and causing damage to the roof structure or interior of the house. It also helps to reduce blowing by leaving the shingle flat.
Layer 7: Roof Ridge Caps
Ridge cuts the surface and appearance of the roof by creating a gasket between the joints between the two sides. Typical shingles do not cover the ridge, so special, extra-long shingles are installed along the ridge height of an inclined roof. It fits between the joint and the two edges, keeps rain and snow away from the house and lets hot air escape.

Finding and Repair Roof Leaks

How Much to Repair Roof Leaks?
Roof repairs average between $300 and $1,400. Minor roof repairs cost $150 to $400 to repair shingles, flash lightning and patch small leaks. Moderate repairs cost between $400 and $1,000 to replace flash, valley shingles and areas with leaks and water damage. Extensive damage can cost $1,000 to $3,000 to fix sagging roofs, leaks, and structural repairs.

Roof inspections cost between $150 and $350 and are carried out at the first sign of leaks, cracks, curling or missing shingles. Replacing roofs costs an average of $5,000 to $11,000. Most roofers charge between $150 and $300 as a minimum service fee.

On the surface, a roof may look like a simple layer of tiles, shingles, and slate. In fact, it is a complex system consisting of several layers of different materials that resist the forces of nature and help you control humidity and temperature levels. Each roof layer has a specific purpose, and they work together to protect your home and increase living comfort under the roof. Let us look at the layers that penetrate a roof and their purpose.

How to Repair a Roof Leak
If you have a leaking roof, you need to get it fixed as soon as possible. A lot of people procrastinate and put off fixing a leaky roof because they are going to get a new roof in a year or two. However, it can destroy your home much faster than you think.

A leaky roof can lead to major problems such as mold, rotting scaffolding and cladding, broken insulation, and damaged ceilings. We show you some simple tricks to find and repair the most common types of leaking roofs. Finding leaks is the most difficult part of the roof, but repairing leaks is quite easy. If you have water stains that spread from the ceiling and run down the walls, it could be caused by a leaking roof.

Roof inspections cost between $150 and $350 and are carried out at the first sign of leaks, cracks, curling or missing shingles. Replacing roofs costs an average of $5,000 to $11,000. Most roofers charge between $150 and $300 as a minimum service fee.

On the surface, a roof may look like a simple layer of tiles, shingles, and slate. In fact, it is a complex system consisting of several layers of different materials that resist the forces of nature and help you control humidity and temperature levels. Each roof layer has a specific purpose, and they work together to protect your home and increase living comfort under the roof. Let us look at the layers that penetrate a roof and their purpose.

Step 1: Find the Leak
The first thing to look out for is the penetration of the roof. Objects penetrating the roof are the most common source of leaks. If you are trying to detect leaks, first look for roof stains.

In fact, it is rare for leaks to develop in an open area that is not interrupted by shingles on an old roof. The intrusion includes sanitary installations, roof vents, chimneys, dormers, and anything else that protrudes from the roof. Some penetrations are several feet deep, and leaks can be right or left where they should be.

If you have access to the attic, the easiest way to find the leak is to go there with a flashlight and look for evidence.

Water stains, black stains, mold and so on and so forth. The more the water stain, the blacker spots and mold.

Step 2: Find Tricky Leaks Using a Water Hose
Soak a small part of the roof and test the see how your roof will handle this test. A good place to test this is the sloping side of the fireplace of your room, AC unit or some other spot where nails have punctured the roof sheathing.

Run the hose in one area for several minutes and then move it to a roof a little further away. Tell your helper to scream when a drop becomes visible. Your helper can stay in the house and wait for the drip to appear. This process can take up to an hour, so be patient and do not move the tube too fast. You may have to do this in the neighborhood where there are no drops.

Running water will not reveal the exact location of the leak, so do not be afraid. Start by removing the shingles in the suspicious area. Once the shingle is removed and there is no indication of a leak, you should be able to track the leak to its source.

Step 3: Find All Other Vulnerable Areas
When you start to see discolored felt paper, water stains or rotting wood, you know you have a leaking roof. Find the plumbing vent, and other vents, that shoot out of the top of your roof. Note these areas and other vulnerable areas of the roof as soon as possible. Water can repeatedly make its way out of the house and back into the pipe and cause major wood damage. Check the base of vents for cracks and/or broken seams and take preventative measures.

If there is a problem with the vent and you need a quick fix, you will need to buy new breather boots to replace the old ones. If the nails are missing at the base, remove the boots that are in good condition and replace them with rubber washers used in metal roof systems.

Step 4: Fix Roof Vents
Check for cracks in the housing of plastic roof vents and broken seams on metallic roofs. In most cases, you can remove the nails from the shingle on the side of the aerator and remove the vent slot. Pay attention to the drawn and missing nail bases at the bottom. Replace it with a rubber screw. There should be no nails on the top of the slits. If the nails are loose, you can modify them by removing the shingles.

Tighten the bottom with a rubber screw. Press a glass bead over the shingles on either side of the vent to hold them and add a water barrier. Water should not pass through the shingle surface. Wind-driven rain can come through windows, corner boards and lateral cracks and potholes on both sides of the roof.

Step 5: Fix Walls
Dormer walls offer many places where water can seep into the roof. Digging around old, cracked, or missing wall boards, windows, and edges of sidings. Dig around with a spatula knife to see if the area is sealed. This is a possible area where water penetrates through cracks and works its way up through the house.

If you have leaks, unzip the corner boards and check if the corners overlap or blink. Check the siding (step flash). If there is an old or hardened kettle, the two parts will overlap at the inner corners. Dig out the suspected boiler and replace it with a higher quality boiler. Replace cracked, rotting or missing sidings and make sure the new parts overlap.

Step 6: Repair or Install Step Flashing
A step flash can also be used where the roof intersects. Each roof section channels rainwater downhill off the roof. Find where it is rusted and remove shingles and replace flashing.
Step 7: Do Not Count on Roof Cement
Sealing the roof with cement will heal it – at least temporarily. Sealing a leaky roof will only repair the roof for a short time because the caulk or roof cement only has a lifespan of a few years before it becomes ineffective. If you have to replace part or all of your roof, make sure to do it as soon as you can because it can save you thousands of dollars in repairs and loss of investment.
Step 8: Repair Holes
Tiny holes in the shingles can be sneaky and cause decay, a leaking roof and other damage over the years before you notice the obvious signs of a leak. A leaky roof can happen to anyone and many times it happens because of bad flashing, loose nails or where vents and chimneys enter through the roof. You may even find a hole where a satellite dish or antenna holder was at one point.

Roof Sheathing

How to Install Roof Sheathing
The skeleton of a roof consists of rafters and trusses that stand at a distance of 16 inches to 24 inches from the center to the center of the rafter to the next. To stabilize the rafters and support the roof, there is a material that holds the roof together, and this is where the roof casing is mounted. Common roof sheathing materials include several types to choose from, depending on budget, weather conditions and area.

The sheath is nailed to the trusses and rafters and is firm and open. It is vital that sheathing panels are at the centers of the rafters. The sheathing panels will run across the roof and look symmetrical in appearance.

Plywood Roof Sheathing
These are supplied in standard 4 x 8-foot plates and are robust, durable, and lightweight. It also holds roof nails very well.

The most common type of plywood for roof sheathing is CDX. As a quick primer, plywood sides are rated D-A for smooth and knot-free and D for poor quality (missing knots and cracks). One side is better in quality than the other, and in some cases C. It should be placed on the roof. The “X” stands for “exterior”. For rafters that are 16 inches, 1 / 2-inch plywood is standard. The rafters can be placed 24 inches in the middle. To minimize sagging, 5 / 8-inch plywood is preferred.

Oriented Strand Board (OSB) Roof Sheathing
It comes in 4 by 8-foot panels, just like plywood, and is often used along with plywood for such roofing work. Consisting of several layers of wood threads that are pressed around each other at odd angles and bound together with water-resistant adhesives. It is slightly cheaper than plywood and popular as a cost-saving measure in residential areas. Many roofers believe that it is not as strong as plywood and does not have the same nail strength.
Tongue Groove Roof Sheathing
Wood is an excellent insulator, but in temperate climates additional rigid roof insulation may be necessary. When using OSB, it should be noted that only one side of the anti-slip coating should be covered. Roof coverings in the ceiling should only be used when they are visible from the outside, such as a beam or a vaulted ceiling. These panels can be painted, stained, or coated with polyurethane to retain their natural color.
Step Roof Sheathing
Spacing can be either 1-by-6 or 2-by-6. Use shingles or shake tiles for the roof. This distance allows air to circulate without shaking the shingles off the shingles or being too strong or not at all. The shingles through which the air can circulate are placed on a special membrane that facilitates circulation. The tiles are designed in such a way that they are lugs, short bulges on the top and back of the tiles, which are suspended in the step envelope. If required, crotch coating can be applied without a fixed coating. However, most roofers recommend solid cladding on the roof to provide additional resistance to motion and shear strength of the house.
V-Rustic Roof Sheathing
1-by-8 boards extend from the eaves to the outer walls and bump against the plywood roof shell. They are visually more attractive than coarse plywood.

Roof Underlayment

How to Install Roof Underlayment
Before applying the roof, you must cover the coating with roof felt (also called tar paper). Most local primaries require the use of 30 pounds of felt. Some roofers prefer to fasten the felt pad underneath the shingles, onto the sheathing. You can do this with a hammer, roofing nails or cap nails.

It is an important part of the roofing process because it prevents water and air from damaging the roof. Sweeping debris from the roof and structure.

Step 1: How To Get Started
Get your felt paper or synthetic underlayment out. Get out your chalk line and mark a line about 35-inches from the roof edge. This is going to align the base (or underlayment). Place it on the outside of the roof edge. Position it so that 3 inches of underlayment hangs over the roof edge. Use a hammer to hit the top corner of a nail to attach it to the edge of the roof. This will allow the underlayment to rotate before you fully install it.
Step 2: Install Underlayment
Make sure to overlap the lines of the base as you work your way up to the roof. Make sure that there is room for air movement between the lower layer and the roof terrace. Make sure that there is no room for air movement or water leakage between the substructure and the roof terrace in the valley area.
If your roof has different surfaces, the substructure should roll up to about a foot above the valley. The nails used to secure the underlayment should be fixed at least one foot below the valley.

Mount the overlay along the roof combs so that it overlaps on each side about eight inches. Place the entire roof against the wall and position the material about four centimeters from the wall. If possible, slide the overlays under the wall cladding. Make sure that the material has no wrinkles.

Continue the construction until the roof is ready.

How to Install Roof Shingles

Many roofing contractors install shingles in a vertical line or “vertical racking” or “staggering”. They do this because it is a faster installation and still provides a watertight roof that is just as effective of step shingling.

*DISCLAIMER* Your warranty will not be void, but it will be hard to collect the money form the manufacturer if they have proof the shingles where installed “in a vertical line” or “staggered”. The manufacturer will find “pattern curling” or “shadowing”.

Pattern curling is when the roofer lifts the end of the shingle tab every other shingle. Roofers do this as they install shingles. The bending stress deforms the shingles in cold weather, and in the end, they warp over time, creating a striking pattern on the roof.

Shadowing is a patchwork gives the roof a subtle color differences between the various shingles since the shingles are from different bundles of asphalt shingles. If adjacent shingles come from other bundles of different colors, the roof will look stained or streaked. To prevent shading, check that the bundles have the same batch number and that the packaging is not the same color.

Other than those two issues, the stairs-step method tends to distribute the bundles making the coloring blend better and less bending and stress that can deform the shingles in cold weather.

Make sure to find out from your roofing contractor if they are going to lay down your shingles in a vertical stagger. If they are, ask the roofing contractor if this will be an issue with the manufacturer’s warranty. Make sure to get their response in writing.

What is the Cost to Install a Shingle Roof

The cost to hire a roofing contractor to install a shingle roof costs $4-$6 a square foot – based on cost evaluations for the year of 2021.
The average house size today is 2,500 square feet.
The cost to install a new shingle roof on a 2,500 sqft Home?

Basic Shingle Roof Replacement typically includes 30lb asphalt felt underlayment and normal asphalt shingles
$4 a sqft. x 2,500 sqft Home = $10,000

Better Shingle Roof Replacement typically includes 50lb asphalt felt or Titanium 25 synthetic underlayment and normal asphalt shingles.
$5 a sqft x 2,500 sqft Home = $12,500

Best Shingle Roof Replacement typically includes Titanium 50 synthetic underlayment and above normal asphalt shingles like HD color or has COOL roofing technology.
$6 a sqft x 2,500 sqft Home = $15,000

How to Install Tile Roof

Step 1: Know the Weight Your Roof Can Handle
There will be situations where you need to know how much weight your roof can handle. Research your local municipality building codes. You should get a general idea of how much weight your roof can carry according to those. If the roof is old, damaged, or just does not look stable – a heavier set person may exceed the roof weight limit.

If you own a commercial flat roof, you may be curious to know how well it can support a new package of HVAC systems or the weight of your maintenance staff. Make sure to do all of your research on the weight your roof can handle before you do any work on it.
If your roof has different surfaces, the substructure should roll up to about a foot above the valley. The nails used to secure the underlayment should be fixed at least one foot below the valley.

Mount the overlay along the roof combs so that it overlaps on each side about eight inches. Place the entire roof against the wall and position the material about four centimeters from the wall. If possible, slide the overlays under the wall cladding. Make sure that the material has no wrinkles.

Continue the construction until the roof is ready.

Step 2: After Installing Underlayment, Install Flashing and Seal Chimneys, Vents & Vulnerable Areas with Roof Cement or Caulking
To learn how to install underlayment please read the instructions above, located at “How to Install a Shingle Roof Step 2 – How to Install Underlayment”.

Objects such as chimneys that are projected out of the roof can be sealed. Metal flashes can be used for chimneys. The flashing can be cut to fit over obstacles. Make sure to take roof cement, roof sealing or silicone caulking to plug existing holes or vulnerable areas.

Step 3: Install Tile Roof Battens
Batten is a thin strip of material (wood, metal, or plastic) that is about 1 inch thick and 2 inches wide and has the length of the roof. Many tile types have lip hooks to hang the available slats. If the roof has a steep slope, slats are required to hold the tiles. The use of two tiles determines the distance required for the crossbar.

A minimum of 3 inches of overlap is required so that the tiles do not mesh. Interlocking tiles do this measurement for you by locking in together when laying them down. You may get a small overhang from the eaves – and that is ok. Once you have determined the distance between the first two battens, lay the battens down with the same distance between each batten.

Step 4: Install Tiles on Roof Battens
If you did not full install tile battens, you can lay tiles and nail them into roof sheathing – although this is not the best option for full protection against the elements. If you have installed tile battens you can lay the tile on the battens, interlock them, if possible (if they tightly interlock you may not need to nail tiles to the battens), and nail the tiles into the roof battens – you can also use clips to anchor the tiles to the arched battens.

You may have to cut tiles to fit around vents and other tight spots.

Step 5: Install Tile Roof
Once you have finished laying down the tile – i.e. The wide area of the roof – you must cover the top with special ridge tiles. These are rounded and overlapping (depending on the version). The tiles at the end of each row are cut horizontally. The obstacle is the chimney and the way the tiles are cut to fit into the environment.
Step 6: Install Ridge Tiles
After you have laid down most of the tile, you will have to totally protect your roof by installing ridge tiles. Ridge tiles go on the top of the roof where the tile meets. These ridge tiles are rounded and sometimes overlap.

What is the Cost to Install a Tile Roof

The cost to hire a roofing contractor to install a shingle roof costs $7-$25 a square foot – based on cost evaluations for the year of 2021.

The average house size today is 2,500 square feet.

The cost to install a new tile roof on a 2,500 sqft Home?

Basic Tile Roof Replacement typically includes 30lb asphalt felt underlayment and regular tiles
$7 a sqft. x 2,500 sqft Home = $17,500

Better TIle Roof Replacement typically includes Titanium 50 synthetic underlayment and better tiles from Eagle Roofing.
$12 a sqft x 2,500 sqft Home = $30,000

Best Shingle Roof Replacement typically includes Titanium 50 synthetic underlayment and COOL tiles that reflect sun rays from the roof. Cool tiles are from Eagle Roofing
$25 a sqft x 2,500 sqft Home = $62,500

Cool Roof Technology

The popular new roofing technology below can help you save money on your electric bill.
For more information about the products below, please speak with a roofing contractor.

New Shingle Roof Technology

What is Asphalt Felt Roofing Underlayment
Pros of Using Asphalt Underlayment
The main advantage is cost. Although less effective at protecting your home against the elements, asphalt felt paper is the go-to for most homeowners.

Cons of Using Asphalt Underlayment
The use of felt backing on the roof has several disadvantages. One disadvantage of traditional felt roof surfaces is that they cannot be exposed to the sun for more than a few hours. The felt dries out and leaches oil when heated.

  • Asphalt felt also tends to crack in high winds.
  • Can absorb moisture if exposed to water for too long
  • Weighs more making it harder for roofers to move product around
  • Slippery making it more difficult to install
    Leads to less material per roll because of how heavy it is
  • What is Synthetic Roofing Underlayment
    Titanium UDL 50 synthetic roofing underlayment increases watertightness and protection from heat, water, wind, and other elements. Most roofers like synthetic underlayment and has become a roofing contractors #1 choice. Synthetic underlayment is made of durable polymers, which provide additional strength and durability. This type of pad is moisture resistant and provides better protection against the weather than the feeling after installation.

    It is also important to understand that synthetic roofing materials like Titanium UDLF 50 is not standardized – that means no two synthetic underlayment’s are the same. You must do your research to find the best underlayment for your home – speak to a trusted roofing contractor to help you choose the right roofing material to protect you, your family, home, and investment.

    Pros of Using Synthetic Underlayment
    There are four main advantages to installing synthetic roofing underlayment rather than asphalt felt. Synthetic backing materials are tougher, safer, repels water and mold resistant and faster to install. It does not tear easily and is suitable for prolonged exposure to UV and moisture.

    Since synthetic underlayment is much lighter than felt paper, there is more in a roll and is easer to install. Plastic substrates also can withstand a lot of foot traffic, which is important if your roofer must walk over the surface during installation.

  • More Material
  • For example, a typical 2,700-square-foot home requires three rolls of synthetic backing, compared with 14 rolls of asphalt felt underlayment to cover the same area.

  • Safer
  • Synthetic underlayment surfaces are beneficial to worker safety as the surfaces of many synthetic roofing underlays feature a variety of non-slip surfaces for improved walkability. These surfaces are also marked with overlapping guide indicators when fasteners are present, which helps improve the consistency and accuracy of assembly.

  • Moisture Resistant
  • Since it is made of plastic, it is very resistant to mold, which is a clear advantage over felt. Felt products tend to absorb water, synthetic roof coverings are built to repel water. This is important for homeowners who are worried about moisture penetration, especially if they plan to leave roof sheathing open for an extended period.

    Cons of Using Synthetic Underlayment
    Many plastics are quite expensive compared to felt. The biggest disadvantage is the cost. Advance investment in high-quality roofing materials can save you money later. You cannot put a price on safety, protection, peace of mind and comfort.

    Titanium UDL 50 is the Popular Choice for Roof Underlayment
    Titanium UDL 50 synthetic underlayment by Owens Corning is one of the best and strongest synthetic underlayment’s in the market.

  • 6x Lighter
  • 20x Stronger
  • Saves 50% on Labor
  • Water & Mold Resistant
  • Class A Fire Rating
  • Optimize Roof and Attic Ventilation
    In the attic, balanced ventilation is what can save you tons of money on your repair bills and possibly financial disaster like losing a home (due to mold growth or rotting wood). Ventilation allows fresh air into the attic. This helps air flow through the attic – this will also help control temperature and humidity.

    VentSure ® Technology by Owens Corning is able to reduce heat and moisture buildup by taking the fresh air outside and letting it in to your attic. Fresh air flows from the rafters of your home or business through ridge-to-ridge openings, roof openings and gable openings to let fresh air through your attic.

    Solar Reflective Roof Shingles
    Infrared radiation is a light spectrum that generates a considerable amount of heat on the roof surface. Solar reflective shingles are designed to reduce the absorption of the infrared light of the sun by reflecting IR radiation from the roof surface and preventing heat entering the interior of the structure. A solar reflective shingle is defined as a surface that reflects more IR radiation than normal roof surfaces.

    In addition to the potential energy-saving benefits of solar reflective shingles for a building, studies on the degradation of roof membranes over several years have shown that solar heat is one of the strongest factors influencing durability. High temperatures and large variations in roof level can have a negative impact on the longevity of the roof surface. Reducing extreme temperature changes can reduce the occurrence of damage to the roof system. By reducing the amount of heat transferred to the reflective solar shingles, a solar reflective roof generally can keep the interior of the building cooler, thereby reducing the use and strain of HVAC systems in warmer climates, especially in the summer months.

    Solar reflective shingles are designed to reflect the sun’s rays and to make your home more comfortable and energy efficient. They are equipped with solar-reflecting granules to reduce heat transfer from the house. Solar reflective roof shingles reflect ultraviolet and infrared radiation to reduce damage caused by U / V heat degradation.

    New Tile Roof Technology

    Aluminum Roof Foil Underlayment
    Heat flows through conduction from a hot place, like a roof, to a cold place. Like putting a spoon in to a hot cup of water or coffee. The heat from the hot coffee will move up to the handle because of heat conduction. Heat can pass from a warm to a cool area through a combination of conductivity, convection, and radiation.

    Aluminum Roofing Foil Underlayment can create an effective thermal barrier and reduce radiation heat. This can cool your roof 20-40 degrees Fahrenheit and your attic 5-10 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Here is how it works. Since the sun warms the roof, it is its radiant energy that makes the roof hot. Much of the radiation energy from the sun travels through the roof material from the roof to the attic. As the hot roofing material radiates, it gathers heat energy from the cooler roof surfaces, including the air ducts and the attic. The radiation heat from your roof is literally invading all the cool areas of your home. Aluminum Roof Foil takes that radiant heat and bounces it back into the atmosphere. Kind of like how light bounces off a mirror. The sun’s heat bounces off the aluminum roofing foil.

    Radiation barriers like roofing foil reduce the radiant heat transfer from the underside of the roof to other surfaces in the attic. Roofing foil, or radiation barrier, works best when perpendicular to the direction the sun or radiation energy hits them.

    Radiation barriers are most effective in hot climates and in cool climates where the cooling air ducts are in the attics.

    Studies have shown that radiation barriers can reduce cooling costs by 5-10% in warm, sunny climates. This allows smaller air conditioners. In cooler climates, it is cheaper to install thermal insulation than to add radiation barriers.

    In addition to the potential energy-saving benefits of solar reflective shingles for a building, studies on the degradation of roof membranes over several years have shown that solar heat is one of the strongest factors influencing durability. High temperatures and large variations in roof level can have a negative impact on the longevity of the roof surface. Reducing extreme temperature changes can reduce the occurrence of damage to the roof system. By reducing the amount of heat transferred to the reflective solar shingles, a solar reflective roof generally can keep the interior of the building cooler, thereby reducing the use and strain of HVAC systems in warmer climates, especially in the summer months.

    Solar reflective shingles are designed to reflect the sun’s rays and to make your home more comfortable and energy efficient. They are equipped with solar-reflecting granules to reduce heat transfer from the house. Solar reflective roof shingles reflect ultraviolet and infrared radiation to reduce damage caused by U / V heat degradation.

    Arched Tile Battens
    As an integral part of the Eagle ventilation system, its Arched Battens help reduce heat transfer from the attic to the living space, resulting in improved energy efficiency, more efficient heat dissipation, a reduction in the load on the HVAC system, and cooling the tiles, roof and attic in hot weather.

    Arched Battens promote airflow by allowing an increase in air space between tiles and roof sheathing. This reduces heat transfer into the home. With aluminum roofing foil as the underlayment, this creates the most optimal radiant heat dissipater on the market. These applications eliminate water ingress and damage to underlying areas of the roof.

    Solar Reflective Tile
    Cool roof tiles are the perfect addition to any structure if you want to save energy costs. Cool roof tiles not only absorb sunlight and transfer it from the roof to the deck and structure, but also emit sunlight with great energy efficiency. This is like wearing lighter colors in warmer summer months and darker colors in cooler seasons. The tiles have the property of reflecting sunlight and converting it into heat.

    The beauty of cooling roofing tiles is that they have environmental benefits by reducing the effects of global warming, urban heat island effect, smog, and CO2 production. On average, cooling roofs save property owners between 7% and 15% of total cooling costs over time.

    Tile Roof with Arched Battens, Roofing Foil and Solar Reflective Tile

    How to Find a Good Roofer

    One of the best ways to find a roofer is to ask people you trust for recommendations. Watch videos and read articles from your local roofing professionals, like this one about popular roof home improvements, to determine which company you feel is the best choice for your roofing project.

    Your roofing contractor will also help you to design your roof according to your budget and needs.

    If you have friends, relatives, or neighbors whose roof has been repaired or replaced in recent years, ask them what they are using. Look at various sources of online company reviews, visit contractors “social media pages to see what customers are saying, and see if contractors” websites offer details about their products and services and the number of years they have been in business. You should also look for companies with a good track record and reputation. While you can associate a contractor with a recommendation with a quick Google search before they knock on your door, it is important to do research before hiring.

    Once you have gathered all this information, you will be able to make an educated decision as to whether to do this or that.

    If your state requires a roofing license, you can obtain a license by checking your state Department of Consumer Affairs website or state Business License Office website. If your state does not require licenses, ask your municipality. If you want to work with a contractor licensed in the region, licensing is required, so knowledge of local laws and regulations is important. Check whether the contractor has an insurance license.

    You can also ask your contractor for a copy of his business license. It is important to ensure that your contractor is insured and has insurance coverage for its employees and subcontractors. When you work with a licensed roofer, insurance reduces your financial risk and increases the chances of a professional installation. It also protects you and the workers from getting hurt on your property.

    We recommend an Owens Corning Platinum Contractor for your roofing repair and installation needs.